Decentralization in Africa and the Nature of Local Governments’ Competition: Evidence from Benin - HAL Accéder directement au contenu
Article dans une revue International Tax and Public Finance Année : 2014

Decentralization in Africa and the Nature of Local Governments’ Competition: Evidence from Benin

Résumé

Decentralization has been put forward as a powerful tool to reduce poverty and improve governance in Africa. This paper will study the existence and identify the nature of spillovers resulting from local expenditure policies. These spillovers impact the efficiency of decentralization. We develop a two-jurisdiction model of public expenditure, which differs from existing literature by capturing the extreme poverty of some local governments in developing countries through a generalized notion of Nash equilibrium, namely constrained Nash equilibrium. We show how and under what conditions spillovers among jurisdictions induce strategic behaviors from local officials. By estimating a spatial lag model for a panel data analysis of the 77 communes in Benin from 2002 to 2008, our empirical analysis establishes the existence of the strategic complementarity of public spending in various jurisdictions. Thus, any increase in the local public provision in one jurisdiction should induce a similar variation among the neighboring jurisdictions. This result raises the issue of coordination among local governments, and more broadly, it questions the efficiency of decentralization in developing countries in line with Oates’ theorem.
Loading...

Dates et versions

hal-03571275, version 1 (13-02-2022)

Identifiants

Citer

Emilie Caldeira, Martial Foucault, Grégoire Rota-Graziosi. Decentralization in Africa and the Nature of Local Governments’ Competition: Evidence from Benin. International Tax and Public Finance, 2014, 22 (6), pp.1048-1076. ⟨10.1007/s10797-014-9343-y⟩. ⟨hal-03571275⟩
95 Consultations
0 Téléchargements
Dernière date de mise à jour le 05/05/2024
comment ces indicateurs sont-ils produits

Altmetric

Partager

Gmail Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Plus