Emotional Positioning as a Cognitive Resource for Arguing: Lessons from the Study of Mexican Students Debating about Drinking Water Management - HAL Accéder directement au contenu
Article dans une revue Pragmatics and Society Année : 2017

Emotional Positioning as a Cognitive Resource for Arguing: Lessons from the Study of Mexican Students Debating about Drinking Water Management

Résumé

This paper consists of a detailed analysis of how the participants in a debate build their emotional position during the interaction and how such a position is strongly related to the conclusion they defend. In this case study, teenage Mexican students, arguing about access to drinking water, display extensive discursive work on the emotional tonality given to the issue. Plantin's (2011) methodological tools are adopted to follow two alternative emotional framings produced by disagreeing students, starting from a common, highly negative, thymic tonality. Through the analysis of four parameters (distance to the problem ; causality/agentivity; possibility of control and conformity to the norms) we describe how the emotional dimension of schematization (Grize 1997) is argumentatively relevant. In authentic discourse, it is impossible to separate emotion from reason. The conclusion section discusses the implications for the design of argumentation-based pedagogical activities.
Fichier principal
Vignette du fichier
POL_Revised2_072016-HAL.pdf ( 380.07 Ko ) Télécharger
Origine : Fichiers produits par l'(les) auteur(s)
Loading...

Dates et versions

halshs-01580439, version 1 (21-02-2022)

Identifiants

Citer

Claire Polo, Christian Plantin, Kristine Lund, Gerald P. Niccolai. Emotional Positioning as a Cognitive Resource for Arguing: Lessons from the Study of Mexican Students Debating about Drinking Water Management. Pragmatics and Society, 2017, 8 (2), pp.323-354. ⟨10.1075/ps.8.3.01pol⟩. ⟨halshs-01580439⟩
388 Consultations
75 Téléchargements
Dernière date de mise à jour le 19/05/2024
comment ces indicateurs sont-ils produits

Altmetric

Partager

Gmail Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Plus